Críticas discográficas

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 26/7/2013, 10:11

Sí, me temo que es una limitación de la sala del Concertgebouw en la que la escalinata del fondo del escenario le priva de un espacio vital para este tipo de obras.

Has visto lo mejor de la versión, el Veni Creator. La segunda parte es rutinaria y los solistas vocales están discretos. Es muy interesante comparar las dos críticas de Musicweb, la del Blu-Ray de Morgan y la del CD de Quinn. Me siento más próximo al primero y no me sorprende leer sus reservas hacia Dean Smith, para mi un lastre en esta grabación.

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 2/8/2013, 09:35

Crítica bastante elogiosa, de un curioso disco:



Transcriptions for choir a capella by Clytus Gottwald
Gustav MAHLER (1860-1911)
Erinnerung [3:25]
Wo die schonen Trompeten blasen [6:00]
Um Mitternacht [6:07]
Die zwei blauen Augen [6:05]
Urlicht [6:18]
Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen [7:25]
Scheiden und Meiden; Das Knaben Wunderhorn [2:49]
Es sungen drei Engel [4:27]
Im Abendrot; Adagietto from Symphony No.5 [10:44]
Alma MAHLER (1879-1964)
Die stille Stadt [3:30]
Laue Sommernacht [2:30]
Bei dir ist es traut [3:49]
SWR Vokalensemble Stuttgart/Marcus Creed
rec. March-April 2012, SWR Stuttgart Funkstudio
Texts and translations included
CARUS 83.370 [63:41]


‘It is in no way auxiliary to the original, but an independent form, a reflection on the original. After transcription, the pieces are no longer the same.’ Thus Clytus Gottwald, on the relationship between the transcription and the original. Given that he was inspired by Ligeti’s Lux aeterna in the 1960s and that he has dismissed Richard Strauss’s attempts to find a new choral sound as ‘a blind alley’, it’s clear that he has a Boulezian sense of self-confidence about his mission. But given that it’s not truly possible to reconceive the Adagietto from Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a literal transcription for a capella choir, Gottwald seeks other methods to render the work. Harmony and melodic lines are respected, nor can any alteration be made to the structure of the piece.
 
To continue with this example - and it is a singular example given it’s an orchestral transcription, not one of the usual lieder transcriptions - Gottwald has taken Joseph von Eichendorff’s Im Abendrot as the text for the Adagietto, regarding the movement as an ‘air’, a love song, and thus, in his view, in many ways a legitimate approach to take. The potential expansion of the choral repertoire occasioned by such work is a consideration, though whether many choirs will take it on board is a moot point. I find Gottwald’s work on Urlicht, whilst beautiful in itself, devoid of the explicit colouration and timbres evoked in its symphonic-orchestral context. Doubtless the counter-argument is that it could hardly be otherwise and that is why this and other pieces have independence as works of art in themselves. Quite what is brought to Alma Mahler’s three lieder, though, is perhaps less certain. Something seems to blunt her harmonic modernity when her songs are inflated in this way.
 
Gottwald is now seemingly less complacent about the success of his transcription of Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen - which is only one of three pieces here to have been recorded before - and it is probably his most successful transcription in this collection of pieces by the Mahlers. One appreciates that it has its place here, though another performance can be found, for example, on Gottwald’s Trankriptionen album on Carus 83.181.
 
The singing is really splendid, and at a somewhat higher level of sensitivity and dynamic control to that on a companion disc called Hymnus an das Leben [83.458 - see review], which is sung by the KammerChor Saarbrücken. Maybe that is reason enough to invest.
 
Jonathan Woolf
 


http://musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/Aug13/Mahler_Gottwald_83370.htm

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 2/8/2013, 09:41

Y crítica muy positiva a la Tercera bajo Jansons con la Radio Bávara en DVD, también de musicweb-international. Curiosamnete, el concierto en cuestión incluía también el arreglo de Gottwald de Ich bin der Welt..., para coro a capella (cf. el post anterior)...



Gustav MAHLER (1860-1911)
Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen (I am lost to the world) (1901) (arr. Clytus Gottwald for 64 unaccompanied voices) [6:38]
Symphony No. 2 Resurrection (1888/94, rev. 1905) [86:20]
Anja Harteros (soprano), Bernarda Fink (mezzo),
Bavarian Radio Symphony Chorus/Michael Gläser
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra/Mariss Jansons
rec. live 13, 15 May 2011, Philharmonie, Gasteig, Munich, Germany
Sound Format: PCM Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.0
Picture Format: 16:9, Region Code: 0, DVD 9 NTSC
Subtitles: DE (Original language), GB, FR, ES, IT, Korean
ARTHAUS MUSIK 101 685  [96:00]


This concert was quite an event on the international stage, resulting in a line of people queuing for returned tickets at this pair of ‘sold out’ Munich concerts. The DVD was made at those two concerts. You can tell that the DVD is a mix as I was in the Philharmonie audience for the 13th May concert and can identify myself in the front row behind Mariss Jansons. Throughout, the video director has done a superb job providing just enough variety and not disturbing the enjoyment by allowing the cameras latitude to flick around too much. The picture clarity, sound quality and overall production has resulted in a highly desirable Mahler DVD.
 
There is a rather unusual start to this wonderful concert with a performance of Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen, one of Mahler’s cycle of five songs based on poems by Friedrich Rückert. Mahler once said of this particular song “It is truly me”. Here is an arrangement of it for sixteen unaccompanied voices prepared by Clytus Gottwald (b. 1925). It was premièred in 1984. Lasting just over six and a half minutes it is performed by thirty-two men and thirty-two women - members of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Chorus. It is directed sensitively with confidence by their chorus-master Michael Gläser. A true masterwork and my favourite Mahler song, I love the gentle rocking motion of the writing with its exciting excursions into stormier waters. With impressive unity of execution the excellent Bavarian choir produce a heavenly sound culminating in a wonderful cadence.  

Mahler laboured long and hard from 1888 to 1894 on his Symphony No. 2 and made a revision in 1905. At the time of writing Mahler was still establishing a name for himself as a conductor and normally composing in his spare time; mainly during his summer vacations. Known universally as theResurrection this substantial work lasts around eighty-six minutes. Trust and empathy between an orchestra and conductor often takes time to develop, if it develops at all, but here the strength of the relationship is clearly evident. Straightaway in the opening movement I was struck by the assurance and sheer power of this cultivated orchestra. I remember at the opening of the actual concert feeling that the sheer force of the sound was pushing me back into my seat. I can still strongly sense this feeling in this recording. Jansons expertly obtains a satisfying contrast of grey solemn expression from the movement’s predominant funereal character with its exhilarating heroic qualities. Throughout the movement the playing of the Bavarian players is of an elevated quality and feels intensely satisfying. Mahler wanted to accentuate the difference between the first and second movements requesting a short pause which maestro Jansons observes.
 
Marked Andante moderato the exquisitely scored second movement is relatively light and good-natured. In Jansons’ hands the waltz-like opening feels as if it has come from a mid-nineteenth century Viennese dance hall. Such elegance with abundant fine detail is brought out of the writing. Providing a stark antithesis is a near mocking episode of unsettling agitation and vigour. It is fascinating to see, as well as hear, the guitar-like strumming of the violins and violas and the pizzicato section from the cellos is a delight also. Two robust timpani strokes that sound like gunshots announce the opening of the Scherzo. The writing draws on the captivating melody from Mahler’s Wunderhorn song Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt (St. Anthony's  Sermon to the Fishes). Reminiscent of a klezmer band the schmoozing clarinet solo seems a characteristic Mahler reference to Jewish folk music. The potency of the energy released in Mahler’s terrible scream of anguish is striking and puts a brisk stop to the bucolic frolicking. Urlicht (Primeval Light) from one of Mahler’s own Wunderhorn songs is the title of the fourth movement. A major highlight is the glorious entrance of mezzo-soprano Bernarda Fink in the meditative O Röschen rot! (O Red Rose!) declaring her yearning for respite from world weariness. In excellent vocal condition Fink sounds in total control displaying attractive timbre and supple projection. Following on closely is the rather brief and spiritually affecting chorale intoned so splendidly on the brass.  

The finale opens with that tremendously weighty and terrifying scream of anguish which then decays into mere dust. The off-stage brass seem barely audible and I am not entirely convinced by their entry. Confidently led by the biting brass and percussion battery more shattering climaxes follow close behind. There is a distinct martial quality to the brass fanfares interrupted only by tetchy woodwind and angry percussion. Off-stage brass linger in a lament interspersed with birdsong on the flute and piccolo. The large mixed chorus enter with the words Auferstehn, ja aufersteh'n wirst du (Rise again, yes rise again you will). This is mellow and tender and makes a quite spellbinding impact. The text O glaube, mein Herz (O believe, my heart) is sung by the soprano Anja Harteros to magical effect. Her captivating tone feels satisfyingly smooth and secure. Both Harteros and Fink combine with the chorus in the words O Schmerz! Du Alldurchdringer! (O suffering! All pervading). With singing of such extraordinary quality from the impeccably matched soloists and chorus it feels so spiritual. One can perhaps be excused for thinking that they have been transported to paradise. The final section begins with the familiar Viennese string sound soon taken up by massed forces including organ and percussion battery. In the earth-shattering climax Jansons holds things together so wonderfully.
 
On a distressing note, part-way through the symphony given on Friday 13th an audience member next but one to me in the front row collapsed and lay on the floor for some time whilst receiving attention from a doctor in the audience and paramedics before being carried away. I would think that only a very small number of the orchestra and choir were conscious of the distressing situation that was unravelling so close to them. Certainly Mariss Jansons would have been unaware and he was only a couple of metres way with his back to the incident. Some of this activity can be seen but this should not detract from enjoyment of the DVD.
 
The voices of Anja Harteros and Bernarda Fink together with the magnificent playing and singing of the Bavarian orchestra and chorus under Mariss Jansons is remarkable right from climaxes of sonic proportions to the high strings playing the softest pianissimo. Under their chief conductor I couldn’t currently name a finer orchestra. Bravo!
 
Michael Cookson


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/July13/Mahler_sy2_101685.htm

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 2/8/2013, 09:46

Y otro "record of the month" de la misma página, musicweb-international. Ya he perdido la cuenta de cuántos van este mes de julio.



Gustav MAHLER (1860 - 1911)
Symphony No.1 Titan including Blumine (1896) [60:51]
London Philharmonic Orchestra/Vladimir Jurowski
rec. live, 4 December 2010, Royal Festival Hall, London. DDD
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA LPO0070


I have a seven or eight recordings of this, the most approachable of Mahler's symphonies and had no reason to suppose that this one could or would supplant any of them in my loyalties. In fact, I have played this recording more than half a dozen times since receiving it and have on each occasion increasingly marvelled at the sheer rightness of Jurowski's judgment regarding colouring, dynamics, texture and tempo.
 
This is an extraordinarily sensitive and nuanced account which eschews the temptation to stick to the sunny-side and run blithely through the score. There are frequent, telling adjustments in the phrasing which never sound fussy or applied. Thus we hear a lovely swing in the klezmer music, echt Viennese Schwung in the waltz section of the third movement, splendid, reckless galumphing in the peasant dances and a really eerie atmosphere to the Bruder Jakob interlude.
 
Another reason for hearing this lies not just in the quality of the playing but also in the inclusion of the Blumine movement, which Mahler had discarded as redundant by the time of the symphony's fourth performance in Berlin in 1896. Jurowski justifies its reinstatement here by virtue of the sly tension and dynamism he maintains throughout, successfully undercutting any tendency towards sentimentality. It opens with a yearning, melancholy riff for trumpet seemingly lifted from Donizetti's Don Pasquale, an archetypically Romantic theme underpinned by comforting pizzicato chords from the lower strings.
 
The opening of the symphony is very relaxed and leisurely, the orchestral textures wonderfully clear and detailed without sacrificing homogeneity. The distant horn-calls are as numinous as you could wish, then Jurowski builds inexorably to a terrific climax at 14:08, complete with fortissimo trumpets and whooping brass in a blazing tutti. The closing movement is correspondingly thrilling, with Jurowski giving his players full rein for the first tempestuous three minutes. He is alive to all the moods in this music and doesn't make the mistake of treating it as just a bucolic romp.
 
The sound is first class, especially so given that this was recorded live in the Royal Festival Hall. The perspective on the instruments is close but there is still sufficient reverb around them and we are miraculously free of audience intrusion. The violins are arranged antiphonally to provide more breadth.
 
I look forward to more of Jurowski's Mahler with the LPO; this recording is a triumph.
 
Ralph Moore  


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/July13/Mahler_sy1_lpo0070.htm

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 2/8/2013, 10:06

Gracias Ritter. A esta Primera la destroza Hurwitz. Será interesante escucharla.

Vaya crítica más apasionada la de la Segunda de Jansons -que no Tercera, hay que dormir más Ritter, que estaría haciendo  

Aunque el hecho de que el crítico haya asistido al concierto le aporta un punto de vista más amplio que el mero oyente del CD difícilmente tendrá.

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 2/8/2013, 10:10

Psanquin escribió:
Vaya crítica más apasionada la de la Segunda de Jansons -que no Tercera, hay que dormir más Ritter, que estaría haciendo  

Segunda, Tercera, Octava...es que a mi estas sinfonías de Mahler me suenan todas igual Rolling Eyes (ah, no, perdón, ese era Bruckner) Razz Razz Razz

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 2/8/2013, 10:27

Qué le vamos a hacer maestro... unas van cediendo enteros, otras están en segundo plano, en pocos años esta fiebre pasajera habrá desaparecido de las salas de conciertos para mayor gloria de las verdaderas obras capitales de la música y por extensión de la civilización occidental

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 28/8/2013, 10:05

Robertino Bergamasco escribió:Flaco favor le hace Testament a Gielen editando esa Séptima. ¡¡El peor Mahler que le he escuchado!!, versión deslavazada, con errores de bulto, amorfa, pifias de la orquesta por todos lados...da la impresión que dirige Sinopoli. La tengo grabada de la rbb la han pasado ya varias veces estos años... si os interesa la subo.
Ya nos lo había advertido Robertino ...hoy publican en www.musicweb-international.com una reseña de la Séptima de Gielen con los berlineses en Testament. Es claramente más respetuosa con el director, que entusiasta con la grabación en sí:



Gustav MAHLER (1860-1911)
Symphony No. 7 in E minor(1905) [80:28]
Berliner Philharmoniker/Michael Gielen
rec. live, Berliner Festwochen, 21 September 1994
TESTAMENT SBT 1480 [80:28]


Michael Gielen’s Mahler - as recorded for Hänssler - is always compelling. It’s also clear-eyed and purposeful, qualities that might not appeal to those who seek more volatility in these scores. That said, others - like me - will find his readings are a welcome antidote to the unmissable but overheated accounts of Leonard Bernstein and his excitable ilk. As Bruno Walter’s intuitive, resolutely unspectacular Mahler confirms, such a thoughtful approach doesn’t in any way diminish the impact of these complex and demanding scores. Indeed, starting with his unshowy Eighth (Sony) Gielen’s Mahler has become a valuable corrective for me - a palate cleanser if you will - and that’s precisely what I expected from this new Testament release.
 
In this live concert Gielen was standing in for an ailing Klaus Tennstedt, whose readings of this symphony - on EMI and BBC Legends - are among the finest in the catalogue. As for the Berliner Philharmoniker their Mahler recordings for Karajan - the pell-mellish Fifth has just been reissued on Blu-Ray Audio - are a mixed bag, although their performances for Abbado are more consistent in terms of execution and insight. If anything the latter’s Lucerne cycle takes these symphonies to another level, thanks to the almost superhuman playing of his hand-picked ensemble. Sonics aside that’s certainly true of their Blu-Ray of the Seventh (review).
 
As preparation for this review I listened again to Gielen’s Hänssler recording with the SWR Sinfonieorchester Baden-Baden und Freiburg - recorded just 18 months before - and was struck anew by the extraordinary passion and polish of this provincial band (review). The BP’s Tenorhorn at the start of the first movement is a trifle unsteady, but even more surprisingly the Berliners’ performance lacks the convulsive shake and shudder of the SWR account. It’s just too polite, and even allowing for the exigencies of a live performance the playing is far from secure.
 
Well, that is disconcerting, although in mitigation there are some wonderfully innig moments in this opener, which Gielen builds to a darkly emphatic close. The Testament sonics are very good, but Hänssler’s weighty sound, albeit brighter and quite forwardly balanced, is much more bracing; I find that extra zing - which is not at all fatiguing - brings out the acerbic elements of this score. That said, the Berliners play with impressive breadth, a trademark of Tennstedt’s Mahler both live and on record.
 
After that shaky start the first Nachtmusik is altogether more pleasing. The antiphonal horn-calls are nicely executed and the Berliners articulate this oddly jovial, wall-eyed music very well indeed. For sheer beauty of sound they surpass their country cousins, but not when it comes to the music’s compelling strangeness. Curiously, the risk-taking and the edge-of-the-seat playing heard on the Hänssler disc comes much closer to the arc and crackle of the live event than the Testament one. Yes, it really is that arresting.
 
The shadowy Scherzo is somewhat disappointing. I sense that the Berliners just aren’t as committed as they should be; moreover, as a reading Gielen Mk II doesn’t have the shape, heft and structural coherence of Gielen Mk I. Timings are pretty much the same, but the divergent results confirm that such comparisons are misleading at best and useless at worst. The Berliners give an uncharacteristically soupy rendition of the second Nachtmusik that glosses over its essential peculiarities. Despite some lovely wind and string playing it’s another victory for Baden-Baden und Freiburg.
 
It doesn’t stop there, for Gielen is simply breathtaking in his earlier account of the Rondo-Finale. It’s a well-judged and thrillingly apt end to this quirk-shot symphony, which demands to be despatched with maximum thrust and certainty. In fairness the BP do deliver at this point - the stentorian timps are magnificent - but hearing Gielen Mark I immediately afterwards is nothing short of a revelation. Intoxicating, turbulent and taken to the very edge Gielen’s SWR players deliver a finale that eclipses all others. Yes, the metropolitans bring more grace to Mahler’s dancerly tunes, but for a truly complete performance the rustics have it.
 
I trust that the Baden-Baden und Freiburg players - who are scheduled to merge with their Stuttgart counterparts in a controversial cost-cutting exercise - won’t take offence at being characterised as country bumpkins; it’s just a comparative device, for in effect they are the undisputed winners of this outwardly unequal contest. If anything, this Testament release has renewed my affection and respect for Gielen’s Hänssler cycle, which really should be on every Mahlerian’s already groaning shelves.
 
A good but rather uneven Seventh; no match for Gielen’s Hänssler version.
 
Dan Morgan


http://musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/Aug13/Mahler_sy7_SBT1480.htm

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 7/9/2013, 22:39



Crítica muy entusiasta de Andrew Clements en The Guardian al nuevo álbum mahleriano de Gerhaher/Nagano en Sony.

Mahler: Lieder eines Fahrenden Gesellen; Rückert Lieder; Kindertotenlieder – review

Gerhaher/Montreal SO/Nagano
(Sony Classical)

Christian Gerhaher has recorded the Rückert songs before, with piano. But here he sings them in their now more familiar orchestral form, in performances taken from concerts with Kent Nagano and the Montreal Symphony last year. Admirers of Gerhaher's lieder singing won't need any encouragement to listen to this disc. They'll marvel once again at the astonishing range of colour and inflection he applies to every phrase, from the veiled smokiness of the opening of Lieder eines Fahrenden Gesellen to the heroic affirmation of the final bars of Um Mitternacht in the Rückert Lieder, sometimes bleaching his tone so completely that the effect comes close to Sprechgesang. Nagano provides perfectly manicured accompaniments, too, though occasionally, as in the second of the Kindertotenlieder, the tempo seems fractionally too slow. Yet against that are myriad instances when the essence of a song seems perfectly captured, whether it's the childlike lilt of Wenn Dein Mutterlein in Kindertotenlieder, or the other-worldly repose of Ich Bin der Welt at the end of the Rückert set
.


http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/sep/05/mahler-lieder-eines-fahrenden-review

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 24/9/2013, 10:55

Recomendable reseña de JJ Puccio de la 7ª de Stenz


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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 2/10/2013, 21:26

Una temprana reseña de la Sexta de Van Zweden en DSO Live

http://artsblog.dallasnews.com/2013/10/classical-cd-review-dsos-mahler-6-good-not-great.html/?nclick_check=1


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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Moreno el 3/10/2013, 13:32

Psanquin escribió:Una temprana reseña de la Sexta de Van Zweden en DSO Live

http://artsblog.dallasnews.com/2013/10/classical-cd-review-dsos-mahler-6-good-not-great.html/?nclick_check=1
Psanquin, se ve que Zweden y Dallas van fuertes con Mahler ¿Nuevo ciclo? Un pajarito me ha dicho que yes. Un corto vídeo sobre la Cuarta:


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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 3/10/2013, 13:50

Pues ojalá así sea. Al crítico no le convence esta Sexta. No la conozco aun pero sí la grabación en Amsterdam de su gira y esa sí fue una Sexta magnífica.

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  gustavo el 3/10/2013, 15:07

Psanquin escribió:Pues ojalá así sea. Al crítico no le convence esta Sexta. No la conozco aun pero sí la grabación en Amsterdam de su gira y esa sí fue una Sexta magnífica.
Lo puedo creer, pues se trata de un buen director mahleriano. Evidentemente la Concertgebouw es mucho mejor que la Dallas, no? Cool 

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 17/10/2013, 00:21

En Musicweb Dan Morgan comenta la Sexta de Nott. Le ha decepcionado bastante (por suerte no suelo coincidir con él  )

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/Oct13/Mahler_sy6_7191.htm


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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  gustavo el 17/10/2013, 09:27

Vaya, pues la pone por los suelos y sólo salva el Andante... Buen juego de palabras al decir que quizás Nott se redima con la Octava. Razz Razz Razz 

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 17/10/2013, 09:35

gustavo escribió:Vaya, pues la pone por los suelos y sólo salva el Andante...  Buen juego de palabras al decir que quizás Nott se redima con la Octava.  Razz Razz Razz 
O quizás nos ofrezca una inFausta versión Razz 

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 17/10/2013, 13:34

Psanquin escribió:En Musicweb Dan Morgan comenta la Sexta de Nott. Le ha decepcionado bastante (por suerte no suelo coincidir con él  )
No conozco la grabación (mi cupo de Sextas está sobrepasado por el momento, sobre todo ahora que estoy más afrancesado que nunca*  ), pero estas críticas que dicen frases tipo "fulano logra esto o aquello, pero no logra lo que mengano con la orquesta de no sé dónde" (por mucho que en este caso, mengano sea Boulez y la orquesta la WP) la verdad es que me aburren cada día más Rolling Eyes .

(*) La excepción es que al fin me he hecho, en Ludwig Beck en Múnich, con el arreglo pianístico de la Sexta por Zemlinsky y de la Séptima por Casella en MDG--aún pendiente de escucha...

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 17/10/2013, 15:55

Voy a enviar una queja formal a la embajada francesa haciendo responsable civil subsidiario al estado francés de que no compres más Sextas, Herr Ritter Razz  Por cierto, un Paparazzi ha publicado unas fotos en las que sales con gabardina gris y gafas de sol de Ludwig Beck llevando bajo el brazo un misterioso paquete envuelto en papel de periódico, en concreto de Le Monde. Ahora ya sabemos el contenido Laughing Laughing Laughing 

A ver que te parecen las transcripciones. es una escucha muy recomendable más que nada por lo mucho que nos hacen añorar y admirar la orquestación de Mahler. A ver si sobrevives a ellas (mucho mejor la de Zemlinsky).

Pues sí, a mi tampoco me convencen mucho ni las reseñas ni los criterios de DM y eso que admira el ciclo de Zinman (aunque a partir de la 6ª baja su entusiasmo). Hace poco le leí lo siguiente: "La Quinta de Mahler de Horenstein es la más incandescente que nunca haya oído". Una frase maximalista de las que hace levantar las cejas Suspect

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 17/10/2013, 16:08

Psanquin escribió:Voy a enviar una queja formal a la embajada francesa haciendo responsable civil subsidiario al estado francés de que no compres más Sextas, Herr Ritter Razz  Por cierto, un Paparazzi ha publicado unas fotos en las que sales con gabardina gris y gafas de sol de Ludwig Beck llevando bajo el brazo un misterioso paquete envuelto en papel de periódico, en concreto de Le Monde. Ahora ya sabemos el contenido Laughing Laughing Laughing 
Era Le Figaro, ¡por favor! Laughing  Yo no envuelvo paquetes (por muy sospechosos que sean) en las hojas de un periódico con el que esté relacionado, aunque sea muy tangencialmente, Ignacio Ramonet Evil or Very Mad  (bueno, vale, este último comentario debería estar en el subforo privado--sorry  )

A ver que te parecen las transcripciones. es una escucha muy recomendable más que nada por lo mucho que nos hacen añorar y admirar la orquestación de Mahler. A ver si sobrevives a ellas (mucho mejor la de Zemlinsky).
Sí, pero a mí cada vez me gusta más conocer la música así, en forma "esquelética" y depurada...muchas veces (no siempre, claro), te percatas de la grandeza (o ausencia de ella) de la música si no está enriquecida por la orquestación...vediamo

Un abrazo,


Última edición por Ritter el 17/10/2013, 17:23, editado 1 vez

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Psanquin el 17/10/2013, 16:15

No invoques subforos resbaladizos que Gustavo en seguida abre la caja de Pandora Very Happy 

Seremos todo oídos. Esperemos que el esqueleto mahleriano supere tu test de esfuerzo. No seas muy exigente  

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  gustavo el 17/10/2013, 16:36

Psanquin escribió:No invoques subforos resbaladizos que Gustavo en seguida abre la caja de Pandora Very Happy 

Seremos todo oídos. Esperemos que el esqueleto mahleriano supere tu test de esfuerzo. No seas muy exigente  
Qué va, qué va, coincido plenamente con Herr Ritter en su interés por el transfondo, el esqueleto de la música, ya que a veces el envoltorio (la orquestación) puede tapar el horripilante o vacío contenido. Pongamos por ejemplo el Ein Heldenleben de Richard Strauss y veremos que el esqueleto es raquítico, vamos que no hay esqueleto... M. Green 

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 17/10/2013, 16:57

gustavo escribió:Qué va, qué va, coincido plenamente con Herr Ritter en su interés por el transfondo, el esqueleto de la música, ya que a veces el envoltorio (la orquestación) puede tapar el horripilante o vacío contenido.  Pongamos por ejemplo el Ein Heldenleben de Richard Strauss y veremos que el esqueleto es raquítico, vamos que no hay esqueleto... M. Green 
Pues sí, probablemente tengas razón, Gustavo. Si bien a mi Ein Heldenleben me parece un brillante display orquestal, sólo con pensar en una reducción para piano de la obra, me dan los siete males...affraid Razz  ...

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  gustavo el 17/10/2013, 16:59

En cuanto al otro envoltorio, el del periódico, no comment. Me parece que las noticias económicas que se van sucediendo hablan por sí solas...  

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Re: Críticas discográficas

Mensaje  Ritter el 23/10/2013, 09:30



Os reproduzco a continuación un extracto (referente a la de Mahler) de la crítica aparecida hoy en www.musicweb-international.com, firmada por Jonathan Woolf, al álbum "Leonard Bernstein: Historic Recordings 1941-1961" de West Hill Radio Archives.

"...Disc three opens with a 26-minute rehearsal sequence of Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony (Boston, March 1949). The previous year he’d given Boston’s first performance of the work since 1918. It was a work with which he was to remain vividly associated and the studio discs remain imperishable examples of his art. This Boston rehearsal was part of an NBC ‘Dress Rehearsal’ series and we can hear him singing - grunting, really - Urlicht in default of a soloist as well as demonstrating his patient professionalism throughout. Instructions are precise and his insistence on perfectly shaped dynamics, with sectional dynamic balancing, is a constant feature once again here. The subsequent performance, given four days later, can be heard on disc 4. His soloists are Nan Merriman and Adele Addison, later to work closely with him in New York. A local critic noted that, even then, Bernstein was apt to sway and dance, indeed adding; ‘he seems to explode with the brasses’, which sounds right. The performance is vigorous and exciting though not perhaps as detailed as it was later to become. Maybe that’s a corollary of a live concert in which things weren’t quite nailed down exactly; Nigel Simeone’s outstanding booklet notes mention some raggedness chorally, which is true. But it’s a blip really rather than a let-down...".

La reseña completa está disponible aquí: http://musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/Oct13/Bernstein_historic_WHRA6048.htm

Saludos,

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Re: Críticas discográficas

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