Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Página 3 de 6. Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 18/3/2010, 16:43

monca escribió:Pues no estoy de acuerdo en lo de que no estamos de acuerdo. De lo que ya no me acuerdo es de qué iba este hilo originalmente. Razz
No puedo estar de acuerdo con que no estés de acuerdo con que no estamos de acuerdo.

Me voy a comer la partitura de la Tafelmusik de Telemann ¡¡Eso sí que debe ser una experiencia sensorial!! Por cierto, me está repitiendo la merluza cocida; me suenan las tripas a gloria Razz

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 18/3/2010, 19:17

A ver, repasemos las cosas en las que estamos de acuerdo:

1. La música produce sensaciones sensoriales
2. Disfrutar de un buen menú regado con un buen vino tiene el mismo valor energético que "tragarse" una sinfonía
3. El arte no sólo produce sensaciones placenteras sino también depresivas, por tanto no placenteras -suponiendo que uno no es masoquista-

No estamos de acuerdo en que:

1. La música de Mahler (no sólo, pero fundamentalmente) tiene un mensaje "transcendental" que nos hace ver más allá de nuestras narices
2. Existen sensaciones espirituales, no medibles ni con regla ni con balanza, fuera del alcance de la ciencia y el raciocinio descartiano (ahí queda eso!)

Algo que añadir a las 2 listas? Si no hay un poco de orden, me voy a volver loco Mad Mad Mad

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 18/3/2010, 19:20

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:09, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 18/3/2010, 19:30

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:09, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 18/3/2010, 23:59

1. La música de Mahler (no sólo, pero fundamentalmente) tiene un mensaje "transcendental" que nos hace ver más allá de nuestras narices ---> Obviamente no estoy de acuerdo; yo en la "música-ficción" aun no creo.

Esto es lo que yo esperaba de ti, ni más ni menos. Es la clásica lucha Platón-Aristóteles: por los siglos de los siglos...

2. Existen sensaciones espirituales, no medibles ni con regla ni con balanza, fuera del alcance de la ciencia y el raciocinio descartiano (ahí queda eso!)---> Sí, en esto sí estoy de acuerdo; las croquetas de mi abuela escapan a todo tipo de raciocinio por ejemplo

Ah, claro, las croquetas de tu abuela -que seguro están buenísimas- te hacen recapacitar sobre valores espirituales... Shocked Esperemos que no levites también! Razz

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 19/3/2010, 01:08

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:07, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 19/3/2010, 07:58

¿Y esos, quiénes son?


Si nos encontramos por esos mundos de Dios, ya te lo explicaré con pelos y señales, no vayamos a aburrir a la concurrencia... Sleep Sleep Sleep

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Moreno el 19/3/2010, 09:46

The Philadelphia Inquire

A guide to Mahler's world
Posted on Thu, Mar. 18, 2010
By Peter Dobrin
Inquirer Classical Music Critic

Michael Tilson Thomas has been keeping company with Mahler for five decades, first as a transfixed 13-year-old listener, and now as a leading interpreter of classical music's big thinker on death and the meaning of existence. Tilson Thomas brings his San Francisco Symphony to the Kimmel Center Tuesday in Mahler's first symphonic grappling with those big questions: Symphony No. 2, the "Resurrection."

Question: I think listeners might be interested in what you say to an orchestra about this piece as you start rehearsals. Do you talk a lot to the ensemble while you're working?

Answer: It's nice that it's the nature of an orchestra that there are a few people who have never played the piece before. I think that makes it more exciting - that sense of exultancy and also a certain tingle of terror, of making your way through this piece for the first time. These symphonies are big journeys. Mahler said that in his symphonies he was creating an entire world, and to look at the world from the standpoint of how people make music in the world - a lot of it is extremely referential. There is military music and cabaret music and Jewish music and references to Handel and Bach and Beethoven and Wagner and God knows what else.

To my way of thinking he is already anticipating an idea of structure that really would not come into play until the great days of filmmaking, where you have musical scenes and he cuts back and forth between them. Or pans between them. So he's able to walk the line, like all Romantic symphonists, in a piece that has a very tragic beginning, which is going down the road to bliss but which is doing so step-by-step.

Q: This is a piece that has led something of a life outside itself - its use as a memorial for JFK, the grafting of it as the framework for a movement in the political Berio Sinfonia. What relationship does it have to current lives?

A: The big message is that life presents so many experiences: Some of them are terrifying, some of them are ennobling, some of them are disappointing, frightening. But behind all of this is a sense of wonder, and in spite of everything you must hold onto that, not lose sight of the experience of art, of poetry, or spirituality, whatever it is.

Q: Do you believe the beginning of the Second Symphony is a funeral for the hero of the First Symphony?

A: I think all the symphonies are connected. It's all one lifelong log book.

Q: In your recording of the piece [with the San Francisco Symphony], in the third movement - that angry, swirling dance - you dramatically stretch out the tempo not far from the end, a couple of minutes after the "death shriek." Why?

A: Because to me that's part of the whole formal scheme he uses, and I do a lot of things which I feel underscore what the architecture of the piece is. It allows the accelerando that follows to happen in a real giddy and terrifying way.

Q: Mahler was something of a control freak when it comes to markings in the score - like the instructions to wait five minutes between the first movement and the rest. How faithfully do you follow Mahler's indications, and how do you decide when to follow your own instincts?

A: You get up in the morning, you have breakfast, and you live another few days. This music can't really work unless you are recognizing yourself in the music. There are areas in which the music and your life are overlapping, and you are learning about life from the music and learning about the music from life. And over time, a certain kind of emotional terrain becomes natural to you.

Q: When did you first start conducting Mahler, and why has he been such a sustained interest for you?

A: I first heard the music when I was 13 - it was "Der Abschied" from Das Lied von der Erde. It was such a stunning experience for me. I suddenly became a different person. It was amazing to me as a 13-year-old to hear this music that describes in beautiful and ambiguous ways what seemed to be my own world and the world of my parents. The unanswerable question in life. How could someone write this piece of music that was my own individual experience? Part of the film on Mahler I am doing right now is talking to people from widely divergent walks of life who had the same experience with this piece.

Q: I think you conducted the last concerts of [the late mezzo-soprano] Lorraine Hunt Lieberson in 2006 with the Chicago Symphony in Mahler's Second Symphony. What was that experience like, and is there was something about her interpretation you share with other singers?

A: We were to have recorded the Rückert Lieder just after, and we played through the pieces in Orchestra Hall after rehearsal. She sang them so beautifully that I was terrified - because it was this empty hall, and we were discussing a few things about a turning point in the piece, and I was encouraging her to just be very spontaneous, because the song repeats the same line, the same phrases. And finally she said, "I really don't have to sing them, I can just talk them."

I said, right, of course, and it's one of the great regrets of my life that I didn't have recording going on. She was having certain health issues that week, and I think she was aware something was happening. And at that moment she sang with her entire heart to that empty hall.

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/magazine/88337372.html

Moreno

Cantidad de envíos : 1358
Fecha de inscripción : 21/02/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 20/3/2010, 01:34

Bravo por la entrevista Moreno. Muy jugosa en todos los sentidos brindis

No es por aburrir con el tema pero hoy me he encontrado en el concierto de la Sinfónica con un nuevo dato empírico. La letra del final de la Primera Sinfonía de Scriabin, un auténtico himno a la Música, dice

"Que tu espíritu poderoso y libre
reine todopoderosamente sobre la tierra;
y que la humanidad, elevada por ti
pueda llevar a cabo una acción noble." (traductor desconocido)

Oportunamente en las notas dice Carolina Queipo: "Como fruto de sus primeras influencias filosóficas de Kant y Nietzsche, Scriabin pensaba que sus primeras sinfonías exaltaban el poder de transformación de la música pudiendo llegar a elevar el espíritu humano hasta alcanzar un estado de fraternidad e iluminación en su audiencia".

Un dato empírico más a favor del poder de transformación de la música sobre el ser humano

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 20/3/2010, 10:03

Gracias, Moreno y Psanquin, por "echarme una manita": ya hablaremos de la comisión en otro momento.... clown
A ver si nuestro abogado del diablo da su brazo a torcer, aunque no creo que esté por la labor No En cualquier caso, parece que hay suficientes evidencias y testimonios que confirman el poder de la música (muy en particular, la de Mahler) para influir en el espíritu e influir en nuestra escala de valores... Eso sí, no necesariamente nos convierte en mejores personas porque del pensamiento a la acción hay un trecho que no todos estamos dispuestos a emprender. Pero es una buena ayuda, no?

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 20/3/2010, 19:13

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:06, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  monca el 21/3/2010, 00:32

monca escribió:De hecho hace unos años leí e imprimí un artículo (que por desgracia no encuentro por ninguna parte) de la univerdad de, digamoooos, Nebraska, donde se afirma que había una misma zona cerebral que se activa ante al menos tres clases de estímulos placenteros: el musical, el gastronómico y (no podía faltar) el sexual.
Le he dado un repaso al trastero, pero mucho me temo que el dichoso texto se perdió en el limbo de alguna mudanza. No He estado buceando por ahí y he encontrado esta pequeña referencia donde viene a mencionar más o menos lo mismo:



http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=music-in-your-head

monca
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 800
Fecha de inscripción : 15/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 21/3/2010, 01:22

Robertino Bergamasco escribió:... aunque vete tú a saber, quizás el producto de mi poca fe, también va a ser culpa de Mahler. Razz Razz Razz
Para no creer en nada le das mucha importancia a la fé. Lo que estamos discutiendo no es una cuestión de fé. Es un hecho objetivo que evidentemente no se puede reducir a ninguna ecuación física como todo lo relacionado con las emociones, conductas, con la personalidad humana en general. En ese tipo de estudios la estadistica de poblaciones, el empirismo en definitiva es la herramienta de la que disponemos para avanzar en el conocimiento.

Yo no creo que nunca hayas visto un espejismo del desierto, pero no por ello niegas su existencia. Como mucho podras decir, como no lo he vivido nunca y soy una persona esceptica, no digo ni que existan ni dejen de existir. Pero no creo que niegues que existan. Y como eso tantisimas cosas.

Monca gracias por el articulo; no es el que pensabas pero me aclara la cuestion. Yo pensaba en un centro comun en las vias auditiva, gustativa y en el eje neuroendocrino resposable de la reproducion. Veo ahora, con mas calma, que te referias a la integracion de las sensaciones placenteras que efectivamente tiene lugar en el sistema limbico; no solo de esas vias sino tambien de muchas mas.

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 21/3/2010, 02:13

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:05, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 21/3/2010, 02:49

Robertino Bergamasco escribió:Bueno, antes de irme a la cama, que hoy ha sido un día largo y cansado:

Yo te leo ya en la cama. No me rindo :-)

Es la misma argumentación de los creyentes; como hay tantos, debería creer de que existe un dios, llamemoslo X.

La respuesta es muy sencilla; el metodo empírico no pretende demostrar la existencia de dios pues primero habría que definir que es dios. Simplemente nos certificaria que un determinado subgrupo de la población cree en la existencia de dios.

En el caso de la música no se trata de demostrar la existencia de nada. Simplemente se constataria que un porcentaje x de la población siente la influencia de la musica de Mahler de una forma que trasciende lo estrictamente musical.

Que a un gran grupo de melomanos les "sienta" bien Mahler, y alcanzan el nirvana con él, no me demuestra que eso exista.

No hablamos de una experiencia mística de ese estilo, pero aún suponiendo que se tratase de eso creo que esta es la clave del asunto. Me temo que ante un número de testimonios significativo uno debería ser mínimamente prudente y en el peor de los casos decir; yo no siento esa influencia pero no por ello negare que pueda existir.

Por seguir con ejemplos. Nadie duda que la exposicion al sol causa cancer de piel pero realmente no se sabe el mecanismo. Solo existen unas estadisticas que aconsejan tomar precauciones. Pero esta claro que mucha gente que en el pasado no las ha tomado no desarrolla cáncer. Pero no por ello ponen en duda esos estudios de poblacion; ni dicen razoname por que produce cáncer y entonces lo creeré.

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Moreno el 21/3/2010, 09:24

Robertino, la verdad es que me cuesta creer que no creas en el poder creador de la música Razz
“la última esperanza de la humanidad”
Giuseppe Sinopoli

Moreno

Cantidad de envíos : 1358
Fecha de inscripción : 21/02/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 21/3/2010, 14:15

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:04, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/3/2010, 01:15

En relación con este tema me he encontrado en el libro de Trías -el día que lo acabe os invito a una ronda de brindis - con una bonita y oportuna cita de los Sonetos a Orfeo de Rilke: "Canta Orfeo y todo se transforma".

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/3/2010, 01:24

Eso ya lo he dicho, que me parece muy bien que un porcentaje x sienta esa influencia
Very Happy Yo creo que al final y como decía Monca todos estamos de acuerdo en el fondo.

Esta frase no la entiendo Robertino scratch :

Los hay muy convencidos de que el holocausto nunca existió; a esos también les pediría que lo demostrasen si tan categorico y evidente es.
Precisamente son los que afirman -absurdamente- que el holocausto no existió los que se escudan en no tener que probar nada. Estos negacionistas del holocausto se limitan a decir que no hay pruebas de que existió. Se cierran comodamente en su vergonzosa postura diciendo que las evidencias históricas son para ellos montajes.

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 22/3/2010, 10:03

Menuda polvareda que ha levantado este temita!!! Bien, de eso se trata, de debatir y de que cada uno dé sus opiniones. Evidentemente en asuntos tan filosóficos como este donde 2+2 no es igual a 4, las mentes descartianas tienen grandes problemas para aceptar las pruebas empíricas. Robertino, no te enfades ni te sientas "atacado" por los que creemos en los efectos transformadores de la música (de Mahler). Te puedo garantizar que en muchas cosas soy bastante "descartiano" y "santotomasino": si no lo veo y lo toco, no me lo creo... Pero cuando alguien ha tenido repetidamente estas experiencias "transcendentales" al escuchar determinadas obras musicales, no le queda más remedio que aceptar y "disfrutar" de esa influencia desde mi punto de vista muy positiva. No se trata de dogmatizar nada, simplemente de contar una experiencia personal y, que casualmente, es compartida por un grupo elevado de personas -según los testimonios que hemos oído y leído-.

El tema del holocausto es otro cantar: aquí sí que hay pruebas irrefutables de su existencia, testimonios variados y campos de concentración que se pueden visitar para terminar de convercerse...

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Ignorante el 22/3/2010, 10:43

Psanquin escribió:En relación con este tema me he encontrado en el libro de Trías con una bonita y oportuna cita de los Sonetos a Orfeo de Rilke: "Canta Orfeo y todo se transforma".

En este contexto también se suele citar otro verso de Rilke: "Tienes que cambiar tu vida". Así acaba el poema "Torso arcaico de Apolo" ("torso" en el sentido de "escultura sin cabeza ni extremidades").

http://www.saltana.org/2/docar/0236.htm

Ignorante

Cantidad de envíos : 263
Localización : Asylum Ignorantiae
Fecha de inscripción : 31/03/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/3/2010, 11:40

Gracias por el link Ignorante. Leyéndolo se da cuenta uno de lo dificilísimo que debe ser traducir esos poemas. No sé que se quiere decir con "su examinar con estrecheza persiste destacándose". Ya por curiosidad y aprovechando tu sapiencia Ignorante: ¿Augenäpfel? ¿por qué lo traduce sólo como ojos? ¿Qué sería? ¿Ojos saltones?

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 22/3/2010, 15:47

X


Última edición por Robertino Bergamasco el 3/1/2012, 20:03, editado 1 vez

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Ignorante el 22/3/2010, 17:33

Psanquin escribió:Leyéndolo se da cuenta uno de lo dificilísimo que debe ser traducir esos poemas. No sé que se quiere decir con "su examinar con estrecheza persiste destacándose". Ya por curiosidad y aprovechando tu sapiencia Ignorante: ¿Augenäpfel? ¿por qué lo traduce sólo como ojos? ¿Qué sería? ¿Ojos saltones?

Traducir poesía es un arte al alcance de muy pocas personas. Puedes hacer una traducción literal, en prosa, pero entonces el poema pierde casi toda su gracia, ya que en la poesía el ritmo y la sonoridad de las palabras es tan importante como el contenido. La traducción del poema de Rilke que he citado antes intenta crear un poema, pero no parece que haya tenido mucho éxito. ¡Qué cosa más plúmbea! Reconozco que tenía que haberme esmerado un poco más en buscar una traducción aceptable. La incomprensible frase "su examinar con estrecheza persiste destacándose" comete el error de traducir "sein Schauen" ("su ver", "su vista") como "su examinar"; esto es un error muy grave porque se pierde la conexión con los dos últimos versos, donde se vuelve a hablar de ver: "ahí no hay un solo lugar que no te vea". Que esa visión es "estrecha" significa que al haber desaparecido la cabeza, la capacidad de ver de la escultura está reducida. Y "persiste destacándose" significa algo así como que la visión, aun limitada, se mantiene y resplandece. En fin, yo no soy poeta y sólo puedo aplicar a esto el sentido común, no el talento.

Por lo demás, "Augenäpfel" significa "globos oculares".

Por si queréis comparar, aquí tenéis otras traducciones del poema (la primera está en inglés y pareee muy buena):
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/794694
http://loquepasaentenerife.com/blog/melchorpadilla/12-04-2008/torsodemileto
http://aviveelseso.blogspot.com/2007/09/torso-de-apolo-arcaico-rm-rilke.html

Ignorante

Cantidad de envíos : 263
Localización : Asylum Ignorantiae
Fecha de inscripción : 31/03/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/3/2010, 18:02

Robertino Bergamasco escribió:Yo lo que no se es en que debo de estar de acuerdo. Pero bueno, si hay que estar, se está... pero estar para nada, es tontería. Razz
Más que nada para no prolongar la absurda polémica que si me permitís la autocrítica se podría reducir a la habitual discrepancia entre negacionistas y dogmáticos.

Ignorante, gracias miles por las aclaraciones y los nuevos links ¡Qué abismales las diferencias ya no sólo de estilo sino de significado de las distintas versiones! También por aclarame el término anatómico Augenäpfel; no lo olvidaré. Por cierto, una de las traducciones lo transforma en "pupila".

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 20:53


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 3 de 6. Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.