Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Página 6 de 6. Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Ritter el 23/12/2013, 21:02

Articulo reciente en The Telegraph sobre Der Tambourg'sell (dentro de la serie que Ivan Heweitt dedica a "obras cortas de grandes compositores"). Los listening points ¡se refieren a la grabación de Geraher con Boulez en DG...

Ivan Hewett’s Classic 50 No 48: Mahler – Der Tamboursg’sell
The latest in Ivan Hewett’s 50-part series on short works by the world’s greatest composers


To find Gustav Mahler in a series devoted to short classics may come as a surprise. This is, after all, the man who patented the monster symphony. The first movement of his Third Symphony alone is longer than Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, and any one of his nine completed symphonies can fill an entire concert.
In fact Mahler was just as suited to a small canvas. Like Wagner, he’s a master of the exquisite moment, the sharp pang of nostalgia or otherworldly bliss, caught and held. The thing about these “spots of time”, as Wordsworth called them, is that they don’t belong to the normal temporal dimensions of music. They’re either very small or very large, which is why Romantic music more and more tended towards the miniature and the gigantic.
In Mahler’s symphonies, these luminous moments tend towards the latter. Think of those offstage horns and cowbells in the symphonies, pinioned over trembling strings. They linger on the air, endlessly, and they come round again, and again.
It’s a different story with the songs. Mahler’s earliest works were songs for piano and voice, and some of these worked their way into his great early song sets for voice and orchestra. In the songs, those spots of time to me have a keener edge, because we hear them only once.
When Mahler turned to writing symphonies, the songs he’d already composed formed their emotional kernel. Whole books have been written about how the songs of the Lieder eines Fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer) and Mahler’s settings of the collection of German folk poetry called Des Knaben Wunderhorn work their way into his first four symphonies.
This heart-stopping song is a late addition to that collection, composed in 1901 when Mahler was 41. It’s a wonderful example of a form Mahler made his own: the funeral march, turned into art. He had great models to work from, in the funeral marches of Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony and Chopin’s Second Piano Sonata. But unlike those, this one has a bitter edge of realism. Mahler was raised in a garrison town in Bohemia, and his pungent orchestration in this song has the smell of the parade ground.
LISTENING POINTS:
00.00 A hollow drum roll introduces the first line: “Ich armer Tamboursg’sell..." (“I am a poor drummer-boy, they’re leading me from my cell. If I had stayed a drummer, they would not be imprisoned now.”)
00.52 The second verse follows a similar pattern, but wound up in tension and in key centre, as the drummer boy looks up at the gallows and realises it’s for him.
1.34 The music returns to its dull trudge for the third verse, more neutral in tone: “The soldiers march by... they ask who I was. I was a drummer from the first company.” There’s a flash of pride at this declaration, at 1.57, but grim awareness of his plight returns almost immediately.
2.23 A drum roll introduces a new, resigned note, marked first by a solemn melody in the cor anglais. It’s a deeply moving moment, which will remind Mahler devotees of the Fifth Symphony.
3.00 “Good night, marble rocks, mountains, hills,” sings the boy. Listen to the way the vocal melody at 3.14, on the words “Good night officers, corporals and grenadiers,” is echoed sadly in the cor anglais at 3.18.
3.29 A move to the major key, a surprise which makes perfect emotional sense – particularly when the minor mode returns at 3.40. This back and forth between major and minor continues through the boy’s defiant, desperate farewell. “I cry with a loud voice, and take my leave of you. Good night, good night!”


Hewett termina con breves comentarios sobre otras obras de Mahler. El artículo completo aquí: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/classical-music-guide/10475777/Ivan-Hewetts-Classic-50-No-48-Mahler-Der-Tamboursgsell.html

Saludos,

Ritter

Cantidad de envíos : 2290
Localización : Madrid
Fecha de inscripción : 08/08/2011

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 24/12/2013, 01:48

Un servidor lo había incluido hace unas semanas en otro hilo  

http://gustav-mahler.foroactivo.com.es/t245-mahler-en-la-prensa-de-hoy#30853

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Ritter el 24/12/2013, 15:42

Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed 

Ya me parecía a mí haberlo leído antes en alguna parte   

Vaya difusión que le hemos dado al Sr. Hewett  Laughing 

Ritter

Cantidad de envíos : 2290
Localización : Madrid
Fecha de inscripción : 08/08/2011

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 24/12/2013, 15:45

Very Happy Se ve que no hay muchas noticias mahlerianas... es un avance del año Strauss  affraid affraid affraid affraid affraid 

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/5/2014, 10:36

En este hilo he subido algunos Twits sobre Mahler. Este de un seguidor colombiano -si no me equivoco- nos hará especial ilusión a todos los foreros:



Muchas gracias  brindis  brindis  brindis  brindis  brindis

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 22/5/2014, 12:17

brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis brindis 

Por cierto, qué oportunidad perdida para beatificar a Mahler mientras proclamaban santos a dos papas, que la de aquél!  scratch 

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 22/5/2014, 13:36

         

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Robertino Bergamasco el 17/10/2014, 00:00

... lo que faltaba, no hay mal que por bien no venga:

Will Gustav Mahler Help With Your Digestion at Lincoln Center Restaurant?

http://ny.eater.com/2014/9/29/6868311/will-gustav-mahler-help-with-your-digestion-at-lincoln-center

Robertino Bergamasco

Cantidad de envíos : 4428
Fecha de inscripción : 14/07/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Moreno el 30/12/2014, 19:44

Un año más, gracias Mahler!!!

Moreno

Cantidad de envíos : 1358
Fecha de inscripción : 21/02/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 31/12/2014, 08:41

Moreno escribió:Un año más, gracias Mahler!!!

Síiiiiiiiii... M. Green brindis

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 31/12/2014, 11:03

¡¡Y yo también!!

Ha sido sin duda el año que menos grabaciones mahlerianas he escuchado o visto pero ha seguido llenando mi vida en otras facetas que hasta el momento no había explorado. Danke schön Gustav!!

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  gustavo el 31/12/2014, 12:08

Sigo leyendo la biografía de La Grange y la figura de Gustav se agranda a cada capítulo. Con todas sus miserias personales incluídas...

gustavo

Cantidad de envíos : 3145
Fecha de inscripción : 10/11/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 31/12/2014, 12:13


Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Moreno el 6/12/2015, 23:51


Moreno

Cantidad de envíos : 1358
Fecha de inscripción : 21/02/2009

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 7/12/2015, 10:38

Gracias por la información Moreno ¡Cuánto tiempo! brindis brindis brindis

Sí, curioso proyecto mahleriano que independientemente de su valor es un magnífico ejemplo de como nuestro héroe trasciende lo musical hasta niveles inimaginables hace décadas.

Ya apareció el tema por estos hilos, incluso con videos de la interpretación del Kaplan español.


Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Todtenfeier el 7/12/2015, 18:37

Un cordial saludo amigo Moreno. Solo unas palabritas para decir que me sorprende que ese Luis Conde haya llegado hasta donde sí que llegó G. Kaplan, pero eso al norteamericano le costó fortuna.

Hay forma de tener acceso a esa interpretación de Conde con la Sinfónica del Vallés?

Con todos mis respetos tanto para la orquesta como para el director te diré que para interpretar a Mahler un poco bien como que hace falta algo más.

Un muy cordial saludo amigo Moreno-

Todtenfeier

Cantidad de envíos : 562
Fecha de inscripción : 19/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 7/12/2015, 19:57


Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Todtenfeier el 7/12/2015, 21:26

Gracias Pablo, no me vale esa grabación de este tiempo. Podía haber una de cualquier otro tiempo, pero da igual.
Esto de que a un magnate de algo le da por la Segunda de Mahler y al final "cconsigue" que alguien se preste a tocarla es como si yo, piloto de avionetas, me dan un F18 para que borbardee en algún recóndito lugar.
NO, ni siquiera Kaplan que le enseñó Solti y a la LSO que constituyó el disco más vendido de Mahler (sería por morbo), pues nada de nada. Los músicos se conocen la partitura y hacen el esfuerzo.
Sabes que lo vi dirigir la Segunda en el RFH y parecía un robotito programado. Eso sí la Philharmonia toco de bigotes.
Pero éste es que ni sabe solfeo. Ni siquiera había oído hablar de él. Slds

Todtenfeier

Cantidad de envíos : 562
Fecha de inscripción : 19/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Psanquin el 7/12/2015, 21:36

Coincido Todt. Es el movimiento menos representativo, pero me temo que sólo dirigió el segundo y el cuarto

Psanquin
administrador

Cantidad de envíos : 8247
Fecha de inscripción : 16/03/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Learning to love Gustav Mahler

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 18:54


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 6 de 6. Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.