ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  meaned el 5/5/2009, 05:57

Puede ser que por aqui aparezcan grabaciones caseras hechos desde un asientito dentro de Carnegie Hall en estos dias que vienen...

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 6/5/2009, 00:16

Bienvenidas serán meaned tus grabaciones brindis ¿Tendrás ocasión de asistir a la charla con La Grange? ¡Qué envidia!

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  meaned el 10/5/2009, 19:25

May 7, 2009
Carnegie Hall
Staatskapelle Berlin

Pierre Boulez, Conductor
Eberhard Friedrich, Chorus Director
Dorothea Roschmann, Soprano
Michelle DeYoung, Mezzo-Soprano
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller, Conductor

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911)
Symphony No.2 in C Minor, "Resurrection"
(1888-1894), rev. 1903)

mp3
http://rapidshare.com/files/231010088/Staats5-7-09Mah2a.mp3
http://rapidshare.com/files/231019087/Staats5-7-09Mah2b.mp3.001
http://rapidshare.com/files/231024316/Staats5-7-09Mah2b.mp3.002

flac files
http://rapidshare.com/files/231004924/Staats5-7-09Mah2a.flac
http://rapidshare.com/files/230977736/Staats5-7-09Mah2b.flac.001
http://rapidshare.com/files/230986830/Staats5-7-09Mah2b.flac.002
http://rapidshare.com/files/230996247/Staats5-7-09Mah2b.flac.003

comezaron a aparecer (no es mi logro este documento), espero juntarlas todas...

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 14/5/2009, 10:51


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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 16/5/2009, 19:20

Sinfonía Nº8

Eberhard Friedrich
Christine Brewer
Adrianne Pieczonka
Sylvia Schwartz
Michelle DeYoung
Jane Henschel
Stephen Gould
Hanno Mueller-Brachmann
Robert Holl
Westminster Symphonic Choir
The American Boychoir
Staatskapelle Berlin
Pierre Boulez
Carnegie Hall, Nueva York. 15.V.2009

http://rapidshare.com/files/234239747/Mahler8-Boulez-Pt1.mp3
http://rapidshare.com/files/234242713/Mahler8-Boulez-Pt2.mp3


Última edición por Psanquin el 21/5/2009, 13:14, editado 1 vez

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Epicóndilo el 18/5/2009, 13:42

Sinfonía Nº3

Michelle DeYoung
Staatskapelle Berlin
Pierre Boulez
Women of the Westminster Symphonic Choir
The American Boychoir
Carnegie Hall. 8.V.2009

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=TJJU3FRZ
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=OEMEQF36

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 18/5/2009, 14:02

Parece que Boulez resulta más atractivo para los aficionados del in-house.

Una reseña de Hurwitz:

BARENBOIM’S MAHLER FOR MICROMANAGERS

Carnegie Hall, New York; May 16, 2009

The chronological sequence of Mahler’s symphonies being presented by the Staatskapelle Berlin took a brief pause this evening, owing to the fact that neither Boulez nor Barenboim will conduct any of the performing versions of the complete Tenth Symphony. This meant that the work’s initial Adagio opened the concert’s first half, an interpretation which, now under the baton of Daniel Barenboim, featured some splendid moments but failed to add up to a coherent whole. The division of the violins to the right and left resulted in an extra level of contrapuntal clarity that was most welcome. There was some striking phrasing, a few arresting jots of color from the woodwind section, and only a few bobbles from the horns. Unfortunately, however, Barenboim’s failure to create distinctive tempo-areas for the movement’s two main thematic complexes rendered the piece monotonous and shapeless.
The truth is that Barenboim is not a terribly idiomatic Mahler conductor, though it can be interesting to hear him impose himself on the music. In Das Lied von der Erde he had the singular advantage of two excellent singers. German tenor Klaus Florian Vogt has a young, fresh voice that’s perhaps a touch light, but which has a bright “ping” to its open and easily produced top that rides the loudest orchestral climaxes. The opening song was exciting and gutsy, “Of Youth” breezy and witty. It would have been even better had Barenboim not rushed through it mercilessly. “The Drunkard in Spring” had just the right tipsy abandon, and once again it would have had made an even greater impact if Barenboim permitted himself (and Vogt) greater lyrical expansiveness as such lines as “Der Lenz ist da…”

Michelle DeYoung is a Das Lied veteran and Mahler specialist (she also appeared in the previous evening’s Eighth Symphony). Though still young, she made an excellent recording of the work ten years ago with the Minnesota Orchestra under Eije Oue for Reference Recordings. The voice has thickened a bit since then, but she still throws herself into the part with opulent tone and plenty of confidence. What she doesn’t do, at least not on this occasion, is characterize as Mahler clearly intends in “The Farewell,” making a clear distinction among the three relatively emotionless narrative episodes and the more lyrically expressive remainder. Still, given the surfeit of dismal singers of both sexes ready to croon their way through this music with affectation rather than vocal security, DeYoung delivered the Mahlerian goods.

All of which brings us back to Barenboim. As in the Tenth Symphony, his interpretation had some excellent moments, particularly in the first two songs. But from “Of Youth” onwards, he developed the strange mannerism of rushing through the orchestral bits, and slowing down whenever the voices came in or did not have the primary melodic line. This resulted in some very strange moments. For example, “Of Beauty” featured the woodwinds both rushing and overwhelming DeYoung with their principal tune (despite it being marked piano). This mannerism was most unfortunate in “The Farewell,” whose instrumental passages, including the great funeral march at its center, were almost frisky, and completely lacking in the heartbreak and longing that the music so clearly expresses (or tries to).

Finally, we were reminded once again that the Staatskapelle Berlin is not quite an ensemble of the very first rank. The horns cracked the top note of one of their most important licks at the climax of the first movement (at the words, “Now, take the wine…”), and the orchestra fell apart in “The Farewell” right after “You, my friend, fortune has not been kind to me in this world.” It was only Barenboim’s control of his players that prevented total disaster. Indeed, “control” may have been the watchword of this performance. As in the Tenth Symphony, it seemed obvious that certain passages were rehearsed much more intensively than others. This isn’t necessarily a good thing, at least not when the purpose of the rehearsal is to achieve results aimed at drawing attention to themselves and scoring interpretive points rather than at clarifying Mahler’s expressive intentions. In this Das Lied, Barenboim was saved by his singers; tomorrow afternoon in the Ninth he will have no such insurance policy. Stay tuned.

David Hurwitz

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 18/5/2009, 14:25


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DLvDE

Mensaje  meaned el 19/5/2009, 04:35

Aparecio una de Daniel B:
Das Lied von der Erde

Carnegie Hall
16 May 2009

Staatskapelle Berlin
Conductor Daniel Barenboim
Tenor Klaus Florian Vogt
Mezzo-soprano Michelle De Young

mp3 320 kbps


http://rapidshare.com/files/234512098/LiedvonderErde_NY09.rar.001

http://rapidshare.com/files/234517868/LiedvonderErde_NY09.rar.002

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 25/5/2009, 22:04

Esta es la reseña de Hurwitz sobre la Novena que se ve le ha decepcionado. Aprovecha para lanzar un dardo a uno de sus caballos de batalla, la antigua Novena de Walter:

BARENBOIM MAHLER NINE A QUALIFIED SUCCESS

Carnegie Hall, New York; May 17, 2009

Daniel Barenboim and the Staatskapelle Dresden brought Carnegie Hall’s Mahler cycle to a close with a Ninth Symphony that was exiting in parts, a touch sloppy in others, and terribly, terribly fast. The model for this performance seems to have been Bruno Walter’s 1938 live Vienna recording, the work’s first and possibly its worst. Even Walter essentially disowned it. But of course, Barenboim is no mere imitator, and he had at his disposal an orchestra much more familiar with the music, and far more technically capable than the pre-War VPO. Still, one’s reaction to his improvisational conducting style depends on whether you listen to hear how Barenboim will personalize the music, or whether you care principally about what Mahler wrote and expected his performers to do.
One thing is certain: Barenboim’s habit of giving every section its own independent and often unrelated tempo risks playing havoc with Mahler’s carefully wrought symphonic structures. For example, in the first movement there was scant difference between the opening Andante comodo and the development section’s Allegro risoluto. Barenboim’s eagerness to whip up the climaxes early and often certainly was exciting, but the central one misfired: no fortissimo tam-tam, and miserably pitched bell-plates. At these tempos, the movement’s marvelous string polyphony degenerated rapidly into mud. Barenboim’s frantic pace in the second movement’s waltz episode also made it impossible for him to obey Mahler’s requirement to accelerate on each of its two subsequent returns. The brass simply couldn’t articulate the music, meaning that whole chunks of texture passed by in a blur.

Matters began improving in the Rondo: Burleske, which was also very quick, and marred only by Barenboim’s tendency to dart ahead suddenly on each recurrence of the refrain figure (two before figure 30 for score readers), and then slow down a bit so as to be able to do it again next time around. However, his only slightly more relaxed tempo for the lyrical middle section is exactly what Mahler requests, and although he had already reached top speed well before he was supposed to, and the snare drummer came slamming in a bar early with his single roll in the coda, the conclusion was as vicious and snarling as anyone could reasonably request.

The finale was frustrating. Coming in at just under twenty minutes, it was once of the quickest in living memory. This isn’t itself a problem: there is no reason to stretch out the music to nearly half an hour as so many conductors do today, and Barenboim can only be commended for his refusal to follow the pack in this respect. But the devil is in the details. Despite the fact that the strings poured on the tone in the main theme, and the big climax was positively incandescent, Barenboim’s habit of starting slowly and speeding up, only to repeat the process at each major musical subdivision, quickly turned into a predictable mannerism. It also resulted in more than a little ensemble unsteadiness during the quiet episodes, creating agitation where Mahler obviously intended meditative stillness. There’s no question that Barenboim captured the music’s passion, but not its architecture, and that meant a lack of focus, an urgency lacking intensity. Listeners have every right to expect both.

Having heard the last three concerts in this series on three consecutive days, I was reminded very strikingly of the fact that Mahler always insisted that his works be placed first on the program so that his players would be fresh and alert. Herbert von Karajan, before recording the Fifth Symphony with the Berlin Philharmonic reportedly scheduled something like fifty (!) preliminary rehearsals. Here there was no question of Mahler being first on the program, but the principle still applies. This is difficult music. It needs to be rehearsed, internalized, and savored. It needs time. Barenboim’s sometimes thrilling but just as often hasty and approximate Ninth may well have been the best he could have achieved under the circumstances, but that just begs the question: Why should any music lover have to settle for second-best simply to satisfy a programming gimmick?

David Hurwitz

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 1/6/2009, 20:36

¿Y qué mejor colofón que la opinión de Alex Ross?


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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

Mensaje  Psanquin el 1/6/2009, 21:44

Shocked Marilyn Mahler apareciendo en medio de la Novena Shocked

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Re: ciclo en el Carnegie Hall

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